Friday Fives

1.  Why is the music of the Beatles important to you?

The Beatles are critical not just for making the best music, or being the greatest band (which they were).  People don’t realize, the Beatles changed everything about pop music.  See, before the Beatles, everything was done one way.  All songs were written by professional songwriters.  They lived in cubicles like you and me.  They worked in a place in NYC called the Brill Building.  These people wrote songs and then record companies would assign them to their stars.

Back then, stars never wrote their own music.  Hell, remember the Monkees?  They didn’t even play instruments.  The Beatles changed all that by writing their own songs and playing their own music in the studio.  It completely changed the nature of the music industry.  Because the Beatles were so insanely successful at this, it became expected of musicians and bands.
2.  Do you have a favorite Beatles song or album?

If I had to choose one, it would be Abbey Road.  It is amazing songwriting.  It has the pop sensibilities of early Beatles, but some of the total wackiness of their drug faze a few years earlier.  I should clarify.  I think the best Beatles album is St Peppers.  However, I listened to that so much in high school I kinda burned myself out on it.  So, it isn’t my favorite, but it is definitely the best.
3.  Who is your favorite member of The Beatles?

duh, George.  The silent weapon.  Hardly featured through most of the Beatles’ career.  Understandable, when your bandmates are Lennon and McCartney.  Look what he gave us, though:  Here Comes the Sun, Something (in the way she moves), While My Guitar Gently Weeps etc.  I think his post Beatles stuff is the best of all the Post Beatles stuff.
4.  Who is Eleanor Rigby anyway, and what makes her so important?

don’t know
5.  Do you have a favorite Post Beatles project/song/album/band?

George Harrison’s ‘All Things Must Pass’.  Plus, George’s work with the Traveling Wilburys.  How awesome was that?

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3 thoughts on “Friday Fives

  1. This article amounts to nothing more then a Beatles knob polishing fluff piece:

    “People don’t realize, the Beatles changed everything about pop music. See, before the Beatles, everything was done one way. All songs were written by professional songwriters. They lived in cubicles like you and me.”

    Hmmm… let’s see, off the top of my head, Buddy Holly, Richie Valens, Eddie Cochran, Gene Vincent, Cliff Richard and the Shadows (he wrote much of his own stuff and Lennon adored him), Little Richard, Jerry Lee Lewis, (pretty much any original act on Sun) on and on and on.

    It’s also interesting to note that bands that where more or less contemporaries of the Beatles (such as the Kinks and the Who), were writing socially and sonically challenging music at the same time the Beatles (and the Stones really) were still stuck on writing rather trite ‘I love you’ type teenage melodrama.

    “Back then, stars never wrote their own music. Hell, remember the Monkees? They didn’t even play instruments. The Beatles changed all that by writing their own songs and playing their own music in the studio. It completely changed the nature of the music industry. Because the Beatles were so insanely successful at this, it became expected of musicians and bands.”

    Here it’s interesting to note that the Beatles (in their golden era, of which your favorite album of theirs is at the tail end of) didn’t perform live. So while you mock bands for being studio gimmick artists, the Beatles where also not playing and experimenting live when the form of rock and roll was really becoming what we know it to be now: a band records an album, and if talented enough improves and improvises of the material live. You may think the Beatles are head and shoulders above everyone else, but put them on stage after, say the Who, in 1967 and watch them get blow away. The Monterrey Pop dvd is just one example of proof on this point.

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